Latest News

Find out the latest news about the Track and the Foundation before you set off for your next walk.

  • National Volunteer Week

    25 May 2020


    National Volunteer Week (May 18-24) was celebrated online this year, with coverage on our main social media platforms.


    We recognised the contribution made to the Foundation by our 400+ wonderful volunteers in roles including office assistance, data entry, brochure distribution, Track maintenance & Support Volunteers, Guiding and community events.


    We topped off the week with this video on our YouTube channel, developed by Volunteer Manager Helen Grimm with the help of Tourism Assistant Katie Stevens.



    As always, we thank all our volunteers for their passion and hard work!

    #NSW2020  #volunteeringwa 

  • COVID-19 Response

    18 May 2020

    DBCA and the Foundation have again updated our Coronavirus response for people considering heading out onto the Track.

    Please visit our Coronavirus Response before you plan or go for a walk.

    Please also be aware that the Foundation's Office Hours have changed as well as how we operate.

    During the current crisis, we are operating with a skeleton part time staff who are working from home. As a result our reception is now closed. Please avoid coming into our office.

    • Phone messages will only be checked occasionally so the best way to contact us is to use the contact form on our website.
    • If you choose to leave a phone message, please also leave your email address if you can.
    • The website will still be updated with current Track conditions in the Section By Section Guide
    • Online orders will still be processed at this time. You can order all maps, Guidebooks and any other merchandise to help you plan your walk. Go to our shop.
  • Support Volunteer activities this Autumn

    18 May 2020

    The Support Volunteers have been busy on the Track during Autumn.  They have just completed the Waalegh campsite shelter extension, extending the sleeping capacity and adding a verandah. 


    Other activities saw Support Volunteers and Maintenance Volunteers working together to clear sections of regrowth north and south of Murray Campsite south of Dwellingup. 


     

    With the lifting of some regional travel restrictions a Support Volunteer Team will be on Conspicuous Cliffs in late May starting the Track stabilisation featured in the latest Bibb News magazine.  The work is scheduled to be completed around October, requiring three visits over the next few months.

    The annual District field days are starting soon which will see volunteers out for a day in their respective Districts making improvements to Track sections and campsites along the Track.

    Sunrise at Waalegh on a smokey morning.
    Sunrise at Waalegh on a smokey morning.

  • Support your local guide: Pemberton Discovery Tours

    15 May 2020

    Having been around for a while (officially since 1999), the wealth of knowledge, experience and appreciation for the environment around them is what makes Toni and her team at Pemberton Discovery Tours so unique. 

    Warren river mouth
    Warren river mouth

    Yeagarup Dunes by drone
    Yeagarup Dunes by drone

    Bibbulmun Track Transfers have been part of their service offering for some time, and they are one of the experts in their field to say the least. Pemberton Discovery Tours have two 4WD vehicles to access those trickier sections of the Track, both of which are licensed charter vehicles. They have the ability to enter the National Parks, and provide a genuinely bespoke and flexible service. 

    4WD vehicle
    4WD vehicle

    Yeagarup Dunes
    Yeagarup Dunes

    Please note that in a post-Covid world, the safety and security of customers is paramount. All trips can be arranged in small numbers or privately, please get in touch directly, they are more than happy to work with walkers in order to cater to their needs in the best possible way. 

    For more details on the Bibbulmun Track Transfer service click here.  

    Check out their exclusive Bibbulmun Walking Breaks package here

  • How To: Conditioning your leather boots

    15 May 2020

    I’ll start with a confession – I do not hike in full-grain leather boots. I purchased these boots (Zamberlan Skill GT) in 2013, and then promptly realized I really didn’t like hiking in them. I do however love them for freezing wet mornings when I take the dog on a short hike, or for car camping adventures when I get to be lazy and not hike - but have warm feet. When it comes to hut-to-hut, roughing it, minimal creature comforts-style hiking - I use trail runners. 

    Just a few things before we get started. These leather boots are not uncommon in that they are equipped with a Gore-Tex lining, and factory-treated full grain leather outer. The Gore-Tex interior is really the “technical” waterproof part that will unfortunately, but eventually, wear out. The leather exterior is the part that we can maintain and waterproof by conditioning it. Conditioning leather stops it from drying out and cracking and prevents water from soaking through the leather.

    What you'll need

    • Beeswax or brand recommended wax/conditioner*
    • Rag
    • Shoe brush
    • Cleaning apparatus (I used a brush from my dustpan).

    What you will need
    What you will need

    Step 1

    Clean your boots. You really should be doing this often, especially if they get heavy use in wet and /or muddy conditions. Mine have not lately, so I just gave them a good hard scrub with a dustpan brush.

    Cleaning my boots with a brush
    Cleaning my boots with a brush

    If yours are quite muddy then you can wet them and scrub the muck off. Allow them to dry a bit. (You can apply wax while the boots are wet, but you don’t have to. However, many have proven that it helps the wax to soak in even further – don’t believe me? Google it.)

    Laces removed from boots
    Laces removed from boots

    Step 2

    Using your rag, or if you have a conditioner with a built-in applicator, start to apply the wax in even strokes to the boots. I remove my laces first as I don’t want to waste wax on laces, and don’t want sticky laces. I start at the toe and work my way up and around the rivets and tongue then make my way to the sides of the boot. Move on to the second boot.

    Using a rag to apply the wax
    Using a rag to apply the wax

    Step 3

    If you have a close look, you may notice (in the toe box especially) that it still looks a bit dry. Your boots will slurp up the wax if they’re quite dry, so apply a little more until they look nice and glossy. 

    Before and after
    Before and after

    More wax required
    More wax required

    Step 4

    Using your shoe brush, vigorously brush any excess wax off – especially around the rivets. (This step is optional really; you can just use a clean part of the cloth and do the same or leave them as they are).

    Brushing boots
    Brushing boots

    Step 5

    Leave your boots to dry a little and let the wax really sink in. DO NOT leave them in the sun, or in front of a fire or heating device of any kind. This will shrink the leather, if you need to speed the process up then a well-ventilated area with a fan should do the job. Once you’re happy, re-thread your laces and happy hiking!

     

    You’ll know it’s time to re-wax your boots when water starts soaking into them. Again, keep them clean. 

    Final note on alternative leathers: if your boots are made of nubuck or suede outers you’ll need to be a little more careful with them. Stick to a recommended product or something designed specifically for suede or nubuck leather. 

    * I am using Storm Leather Footwear Protector, but if your brand recommends a particular product then try to go for that. 

    By Katie Stevens